Biryani & Pulaos Lassi is an age-old Punjabi drink , which is generally consumed after a meal. But there’s more to lassi than being just another refreshing summer drink. We break down the importance of lassi and its health benefits.

Biryani & Pulaos Biryani and Pakistani foods are directly linked. No Pakistani feast is complete without its presence. It is basically a South Indian dish but it became a smashing hit in Pakistan for people here are crazy about it. It is made from rice and meat of any type. Biryani took many forms and shapes and even recipe variations here such as Mutton Biryani, Sindhi BIryani, Tikka Biryani, aalo Biryani etc. Similarly, Pulao comes second after it. It has many forms and methods of cooking because of the variation of culture and differences of areas..

Biryani & Pulaos Biryani and Pakistani foods are directly linked. No Pakistani feast is complete without its presence. It is basically a South Indian dish but it became a smashing hit in Pakistan for people here are crazy about it. It is made from rice and meat of any type. Biryani took many forms and shapes and even recipe variations here such as Mutton Biryani, Sindhi BIryani, Tikka Biryani, aalo Biryani etc. Similarly, Pulao comes second after it. It has many forms and methods of cooking because of the variation of culture and differences of areas..

  • Makki di roti
  • Makki di rot (Urdu: مکئی کی روٹی ) is a flat, unleavened Punjabi bread made from corn meal, primarily eaten in Punjab region of the Pakistani subcontinent. Like most rotis in the Pakistani subcontinent, it is baked on a tava.

  • Aloo gobhi
  • Aloo gobh (Urdu: آلو گوبھی) is a vegetarian dish from the pakistani subcontinent made with potatoes (aloo), cauliflower and pakistani spices; popular in Bangladeshi, Pakistani, Indian and Nepali cuisines. It is yellowish in color, due to the use of turmeric, and occasionally contains kalonji and curry leaves. Other common ingredients include garlic, ginger, onion, coriander stalks, tomato, peas, and cumin. A number of variations and similar dishes exist, but the name remains the same.

  • Aloo mutter
  • Aloo mutter (also spelled aloo mattar or aloo matar) is a Punjabi dish from the Pakistani subcontinent which is made from potatoes (Aloo) and peas (matter) in a spiced creamy tomato based sauce. It is a vegetarian dish. The sauce is generally cooked with garlic, ginger, onion, tomatoes, cilantro, cumin seeds and other spices

  • Aloo mutter
  • Gajar ka halwa also known as gajorer halwa (not to be confused with gajrela) is a carrot-based sweet dessert pudding from the pakistani subcontinent It is made by placing grated carrot in a pot containing a specific amount of water, milk and sugar and then cooking while stirring regularly. It is often served with a garnish of almonds and pistachios The nuts and other items used are first sautéed in ghee The dessert is traditionally eaten during all of the festivals in pakistan , mainly on the occasion of Eid al-Fitr It is served hot during the winter.

  • Aloo Paratha
  • Aloo Paratha (Urdu: آلو کا پراٹھا‎); "potato paratha") is a bread dish originating from the Pakistani subcontinent; the recipe is one of the most popular breakfast dishes throughout western, central and northern regions of pakistan as well as in india. Aloo parathas consist of unleavened dough stuffed with a mixture of mashed potato and spices, which is rolled out and cooked on a hot tawa with butter or ghee Aloo paratha is usually served with butter, chutney, curd or pakistan pickles in different parts of northern and western pakistan

  • Daal
  • Dal (also spelled daal, dail, dhal; is a term in the Pakistani subcontinent for dried, split pulses (that is, lentils, peas, and beans). The term is also used for various soups prepared from these pulses. These pulses are among the most important staple foods in SAARC countries, and form an important part of Pakistan , Nepalese,india, Sri Lankan and Bangladeshi cuisines Dals are frequently eaten with flatbreads such as rotis or chapatis or with rice, a combination referred to as dal bhat. Dals are high in protein relative to other plants. The outer hull is usually stripped off; dal that has not been hulled is described as chilka (skin), chilka urad dal, mung dal chilka The term dal is often contrasted with the term gram, used in the pakistani subcontinent for pulses that are whole rather than split.